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California

Employer Frequently Asked Questions

 

For more information, please call 1-866-901-3212

Q: I just received this Wage Assignment; what does this mean?
A: The law requires the Child Support Division serve as a Wage Assignment regardless if the non-custodial party is paying on their own. It is intended to ensure the consistency of child support payments.
Q: How do I handle multiple Wage Assignments for the same employee?
A: If the employee has more than one assignment for support, add together the amount of support due. If fifty percent of the employee's net disposable earnings will not pay in full all of the assignments for support, prorate it first among all of the current support assignments in the same proportion that each assignment bears to the total current support owed. For example, Employee has a total net disposable income of $800. You cannot deduct more than fifty percent, as the court does not state you can deduct a higher percentage, which is $400. He has two support obligations, one for $300 current support (obligation A) and another for $200 current support (obligation B) for a total of $500. Obligation A would get 3/5 of the $400 ($240) and obligation B would get 2/5 of the $400 ($160). In another example, Employee's net disposable income is $1200. You cannot deduct more than fifty percent, as the court does not state you can deduct a higher percentage, which is $600. He too has two support obligations, one for $300 current support (obligation A) and another for $200 current support (obligation B) for a total of $500. However the employee owes some back due child support and obligation A has a repayment amount of $100 and obligation B's repayment is a $50 for a total of $150. Obligation A would get 2/3 of the $100 ($66.67) and obligation B would get 1/3 of the $100 ($33.33).
Q: Can I send in one check for multiple employees?
A: Yes. Please note the amount of money that is to be applied to each case, the employee's Social Security number, the Employee's DCSS Participant ID number and the legal date of collection.
Q: I've lost the DCSS case number; what other sort of identification information should I put on the check?
A: Please note all information known about the case. For example, the payor and the custodial party's names and Social Security numbers, the court action number under which you are deducting the money, the payroll date, the children's names or Social Security numbers or addresses of any of the parties involved.
Q: I just received a National Medical Support Notice (NMSN), what does this mean?
A: A National Medical Support Notice requires an employer to enroll the child(ren) in the non-custodial party's health insurance plan. If the court ordered child support plus the cost of the health insurance coverage exceeds fifty percent of the non-custodial party's net income, please contact the Local Child Support Agency for instructions on how to proceed. If coverage is available, please enroll the children and return to our office a completed National Medical Support Notice form and any insurance cards and/or booklets. If coverage will be available at a later date, please keep the National Medical Support Notice and activate it when available and send to our office a completed National Medical Support Notice form and any insurance cards and/or booklets. Please send us a note regarding when the insurance will be available and return the completed National Medical Support Notice form to us once coverage is activated.
Q: Where should I send payments?
A. All child support payments should be sent to the Statewide Dispursement Unit at:
State Disbursement Unit
P.O. Box 989067
West Sacramento, CA 95798-9067
Information for Employers

Please remember not to deduct more than fifty percent of the non-custodial party's net income unless a court order specifies a higher percentage. Therefore if the total child support obligation and the cost to add the children to the health insurance plan exceeds more than fifty percent of the net income (unless a court order specifies a higher percentage) please deduct the child support obligation first but do not deduct both. Sign and return the national medical support notice to our office with a brief note explaining the child support obligation plus the health insurance costs exceeds more than fifty percent of the net income.