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Air Quality Health Advisory for Monday November 19 and Tuesday November 20
November 19, 2018

The Public Health Departments of Yuba and Sutter County and the Feather River Air Quality Management District are extending the joint air quality health advisory to notify the public of continued unhealthy air quality conditions caused from wildfire smoke from the Camp Fire in Butte County.

The Air Quality Index levels for Monday November 19 and Tuesday November 20 are forecasted to be Unhealthy for Yuba and Sutter counties. Light and variable winds will reduce dispersion and allow smoke to linger. Overnight temperatures will limit mixing and trap the smoke near the ground. On Wednesday as the cold front approaches the southeasterly winds should push the smoke from the Camp Fire out of our area, but will also transport smoke from the southern Sacramento Valley and San Joaquin Valley into our region. Therefore the forecast for Wednesday is Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups. By Thursday the storm should clear most of the smoke with strong southerly winds. Even with this storm system, as long as the Camp Fire is generating smoke the Yuba Sutter area may experience periods of smoke impacts, though not as prolonged and extreme as the past 10 days.

Current PM 2.5 air quality
Air Quality Index Key
Daily Average PM 2.5 at Yuba city

Smoke density can vary widely from one local area to another and also with time of day. “Air quality conditions depend on a number of factors, which include proximity to the fire, wind speed and direction, and whether inversions are present,” warns Christopher D. Brown, Air Pollution Control officer.

You can check current conditions online at www.airnow.gov or www.sparetheair.com. Residents can also sign up for air quality forecasts and alerts at www.fraqmd.org. Residents who see or smell smoke should consider these precautionary measures:

  • Remain indoors and keep windows and doors closed as much as possible.
  • Use the recycle or recirculate mode on the air conditioner in your home or car.
  • Avoid the use of non-HEPA paper face mask filters which are not capable of filtering extra fine particles. Do not rely on HEPA face mask filters to do unnecessary outdoor activities.
  • Keep airways moist by drinking lots of water. Breathing through a warm, wet washcloth can also help relieve dryness, but does not filter out the hazardous smoke particles.
  • Avoid the fire areas.
  • Avoid burning wood in woodstoves and fireplaces, and avoid other activities that cause particulates to become airborne such as vacuuming or dusting.

Wildfire smoke may contain particulate matter, ozone, carbon monoxide, and toxic air contaminants. While all persons may experience varying degrees of symptoms, more sensitive individuals, such as the young, aged and those with respiratory conditions are at greatest risk of experiencing more aggravated symptoms. Symptoms may include, but are not limited to, coughing, watery and itchy eyes, and difficulty breathing. Persons experiencing questionable or severe symptoms should seek professional medical advice and treatment.

The District has partnered with the California Air Resources Board to install low-cost particulate matter sensors in several Yuba and Sutter County locations such as Sutter, Yuba City, Robbins, Wheatland, and Oregon House. These sensors are not as accurate as the permanent or temporary monitoring stations; however the data is available online in real time and can show trends such as whether an area is likely to experience increasing or decreasing smoke levels. The maps can be accessed at: https://www.purpleair.com/.

County officials will continue to monitor air quality in Sutter and Yuba County and provide updates on this advisory as needed. For current information, or to sign up for air quality alerts and forecasts, go to the Feather River Air Quality Management District website http://www.fraqmd.org/ or check the Sutter County and Sutter County Public Health Facebook pages or Yuba County website.

Health and Human Services Staff Packing 9,500 Individual N95 Respirators For Free
November 16, 2018
Sutter County Health and Human staff Friday morning began packaging a new shipment of 9,500 N95 respirators. Individual N95 respirators are provided in quart plastic bags so they can be stored when not in use, along with instructions on how to form them to your face. The respirators are available to Sutter County residents for free on Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Sutter County Public Health Department, 1445 Veterans Memorial Circle, Yuba City (behind the Sutter County courthouse). The Health Department also plans to distribute respirators as necessary on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Counties Declare State of Emergency Over Yuba-Sutter Air Quality
November 15, 2018

Joint Press Release FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Yuba County call Russ Brown, Public Information Officer at 530-632-5434

Sutter County call Chuck Smith, Public Information Officer at 530-844-0453

Counties close buildings, send all but essential workers home;

effort to assist Butte County continues

With the worst air quality, anywhere in the state except ground zero of the Camp Fire in Butte County, Sutter County and Yuba County today declared a state of emergency, closed most county offices and sent most employees home due to unhealthy air inside county buildings.

Most offices in both counties will be closed on Friday, as well. Employees were told to be prepared to return to work on Monday.

Shortly before noon today, the Air Quality Index exceeded 400 on a measurement scale from 0 to 500. Readings above 300 are considered hazardous, with the entire population more likely to be affected by the toxic air particles from the Camp Fire.

Other than Paradise, which had an Air Quality Index of 500 this morning, the Yuba-Sutter area had the highest reading of any region of the state.

The declaration of a state of emergency could help local agencies recover some costs and access state resources to deal with the air quality issue.

The evacuation shelter at the Yuba-Sutter Fairgrounds will remain staffed with Health and Human Services workers from both counties. Law enforcement, emergency management, and other essential personnel will remain at work. Several employees are on mutual aid duty in Butte County, assisting with the fire disaster.

Health officials and the Feather River Air Quality Management District have issued an Air Quality Advisory. Air quality conditions depend on a number of factors, which include proximity to the fire, wind speed and direction, and whether inversions are present. Inversions trap air pollution close to the ground.

Here is a link to information about the Air Quality Index: https://airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=aqibasics.aqi#haz

Holiday Closure
November 15, 2018
On Thursday and Friday, November 22nd and 23rd, most county offices will be closed in observance of the Thanksgiving Holiday.
Health Advisory Issued due to Butte County Camp Fire Wildfire Smoke
November 14, 2018

Sutter County Health Department provides N95 respirators to Fire Departments for distribution.
All Sutter County Schools closed tomorrow, Friday, and will re-open after Thanksgiving.
List of locations to pick up free N95 respirators.

Sutter County Public Health is issuing a health advisory notice for all Sutter and Yuba County residents and schools due to the continued smoke and poor air quality from the Butte County Camp Fire. At the same time, the Sutter County Public Health Department and Yuba County Health Department are making N95 respirator masks available to those who cannot find them at commercial outlets. A complete list of known locations for distribution is below.

Sutter County Health Officer, Dr. Michael Kinnison, is recommending all outdoor gatherings and sporting events in and around Sutter County be cancelled until further notice. Sutter County Office of Education announced today all schools in Sutter County will be closed Thursday and Friday. Yuba City Unified School District schools will re-open after Thanksgiving.

The Sutter County Health Officer warned that smoke generated by the Camp Fire can pose significant risks to health.

While all persons may experience varying degrees of symptoms, more sensitive individuals, such as the young, aged and those with respiratory conditions are at greatest risk of experiencing more aggravated symptoms. Symptoms may include, but are not limited to, coughing, watery and itchy eyes, and difficulty breathing. Persons experiencing questionable or severe symptoms should seek professional medical advice and treatment.

Any Sutter County residents may obtain a N95 respirator mask by going to the Sutter County Public Health Department at 1445 Veteran’s Memorial Circle, Yuba City. Hours of operation are 8:00 am until 5:00 pm Monday through Friday.

The Sutter County Public Health Department provided N95 respirator masks to fire departments within Sutter County to distribute. Here is a list of fire department locations where masks are available:

  • Sutter Fire Station, 2340 California Street, Sutter.
  • Live Oak Fire Station, 2745 Fir Street, Live Oak.
  • Oswald-Tudor Fire Department, 1280 Barry Road, Yuba City.
  • Yuba City Fire Administration Building, 824 Clark Avenue, Yuba City
  • Yuba City Fire Station No.1, 824 Clark Avenue
  • Yuba City Fire Station No.2, 1641 Gray Avenue
  • Yuba City Fire Station No.3, 795 Lincoln Road
  • Yuba City Fire Station No.4, 150 Ohleyer Road
  • Yuba City Fire Station No.7, 2855 Butte House Road

Any Yuba County resident may obtain a N95 respirator mask by going to the Yuba County Health and Human Services Department at 5730 Packard Avenue, suite 100, Marysville. Hours of operation are 8:00 am until 5:00 pm Monday through Friday.

Learn how to protect your lungs from wildfire smoke

County officials will continue to monitor air quality in Sutter County and provide updates on this advisory as needed. For current information about Air Quality and Wildfire Smoke:

Air Quality Health Advisory
November 14, 2018

The Public Health Departments of Yuba and Sutter County and the Feather River Air Quality Management District are issuing a joint air quality health advisory to notify the public of potentially unhealthy air quality conditions caused from wildfire smoke from the Camp Fire in Butte County.

The current Air Quality Index levels are in the Unhealthy to Very Unhealthy range for most of Yuba and Sutter counties. The forecast calls for smoke to continue to impact the area through at least Thursday. Light and variable winds will reduce dispersion and the fire will generate increasing particle concentrations from smoke until the containment percentage grows.

Smoke density can vary widely from one local area to another and also with time of day. “Air quality conditions depend on a number of factors, which include proximity to the fire, wind speed and direction, and whether inversions are present,” warns Christopher D. Brown, Air Pollution Control officer.

Air Quality Index for Tuesday, November 13, 2018
Air Quality Index - Particulate Matter
Air Quality Index Daily Average for Yuba City

You can check current conditions online at www.airnow.gov or www.sparetheair.com. Residents can also sign up for air quality forecasts and alerts at www.fraqmd.org. Residents who see or smell smoke should consider these precautionary measures:

  • Healthy people should delay strenuous exercise, particularly when they can smell smoke.
  • Children and elderly people should consider avoiding outdoor activities, particularly prolonged outdoor exertion. Parents of children involved in youth sports programs should consider whether their children be allowed to participate when smoke is in the air.
  • People with health-related illnesses, particularly respiratory problems, should remain indoors.
  • Keep windows and doors closed as much as possible. Use the recycle or recirculate mode on the air conditioner in your home or car.
  • Avoid the use of non-HEPA paper face mask filters which are not capable of filtering extra fine particles. Do not rely on HEPA face mask filters to do unnecessary outdoor activities.
  • Keep airways moist by drinking lots of water. Breathing through a warm, wet washcloth can also help relieve dryness, but does not filter out the hazardous smoke particles.
  • Avoid the fire areas.

Wildfire smoke may contain particulate matter, ozone, carbon monoxide, and toxic air contaminants. While all persons may experience varying degrees of symptoms, more sensitive individuals, such as the young, aged and those with respiratory conditions are at greatest risk of experiencing more aggravated symptoms. Symptoms may include, but are not limited to, coughing, watery and itchy eyes, and difficulty breathing. Persons experiencing questionable or severe symptoms should seek professional medical advice and treatment.

The District has partnered with the California Air Resources Board to install low-cost particulate matter sensors in several Yuba and Sutter County locations such as Sutter, Yuba City, Robbins, Wheatland, and Oregon House. These sensors are not as accurate as the permanent or temporary monitoring stations; however the data is available online in real time and can show trends such as whether an area is likely to experience increasing or decreasing smoke levels. The maps can be accessed at: https://www.purpleair.com/.

County officials will continue to monitor air quality in Sutter and Yuba County and provide updates on this advisory as needed. For current information, or to sign up for air quality alerts and forecasts, go to the Feather River Air Quality Management District website http://www.fraqmd.org/ or check the Sutter County and Sutter County Public Health Facebook pages or Yuba County website.

Butte Evacuees Sheltered Here; Air Quality is Hazardous; Free Online Health Service
November 10, 2018

Health and Human Services staff from Yuba and Sutter counties continue to staff a shelter at the Yuba-Sutter Fairgrounds around the clock, housing some of the evacuees from the historic, traffic ‘Camp Fire’ in Butte County.

Meanwhile, Pubic Health officials and the Feather River Air Quality Management District are cautioning people in this region to limit outdoor activity due to poor air quality caused by smoke from the fire in Butte County.

On Friday evening, emergency officials announced 6,453 homes and 260 businesses have been destroyed in the most damaging wildfire in state history. Nine people were confirmed dead and some three dozen are reported missing.

The Town of Paradise was hit the hardest.

Sutter County and Yuba County emergency officials have been assisting as needed. Fire and law enforcement personnel and equipment from both counties responded mutual aid.

Channel 12 is running information about missing persons at this loction online:
https://www.actionnewsnow.com/content/news/List-of-those-missing-from-Camp-Fire-Evacuations-500124772.html

Here’s a link to the Red Cross Safe and Well website where people can register they are safe and others can find you:
https://safeandwell.communityos.org/cms/

For official fire information, visit the California Department of Forestry major incident page:
http://www.fire.ca.gov/current_incidents/incidentdetails/Index/2277

Here's a fee service for those impacted by the wildfires. If you are impacted by California's wildfires, Anthem Blue Cross has partnered with LiveHealth Online to help you see a doctor 24/7 for non-emergency conditions through live video from a smartphone, tablet or computer at no cost through November 18, 2018. Doctors can send prescriptions directly to your pharmacy if needed. You do not need to be an Anthem Blue Cross member to use this service.

Sign up at livehealthonline.com or download the free LiveHealth Online mobile app and select Help for Wildfires Medical to see a doctor.

Cots
Unofficial Statewide General Election Results
November 06, 2018

The current unofficial count for the Election Results will be posted and updated periodically after the Polls close at 8:00 p.m. on November 6, 2018. There are about 3,000 unprocessed ballots.

Holiday Closure
November 05, 2018
On Monday, November 12th, most County offices will be closed in observance of Veterans Day.
Daylight Saving Time Ends on Sunday, November 4 at 2:00 a.m.
October 30, 2018

Daylight Saving Time ends on Sunday, November 4 at 2:00 a.m.

In the U.S., clocks change at 2:00 a.m. local time. In spring, clocks spring forward from 1:59 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. In fall, clocks fall back from 1:59 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. The phrase "Spring Forward, Fall Back" is used to help people remember how to reset their clocks.

Move your clocks back one hour at the resumption of Standard Time.

Contrary to popular belief, no federal rule mandates the observance of daylight saving time. Daylight Saving time and Time zones are regulated by the U.S. Department of Transportation.

Flood Awareness & Preparation
October 26, 2018
Several local government agencies have prepared a short publication to help you be aware and prepare for flood issues.
  • Emergency Preparedness
  • Emergency Alert App
  • 9 Steps to Get Ready
Get the 16 page PDF here: https://www.suttercounty.org/assets/pdf/pw/wr/fp/floodawarepublication2018withdate.pdf.
Download Smartphone App to Get Emergency Messages from Sutter and Yuba Counties
October 22, 2018

The Sutter County Office of Emergency Management is launching a new emergency notification system for the entire county. The system will be used to issue emergency notifications and critical information to the entire county, including the cities of Live Oak and Yuba City.

The Code Red system newly deployed in Sutter County is the same vendor that provides emergency notification capabilities to Yuba County.

Sign up to receive emergency notifications from the Sutter County Office of Emergency Management at www.bepreparedsutter.org.

Sign up to receive emergency notifications from the Yuba County Office of Emergency Services at www.bepreparedyuba.org.

It is recommended that if you live in one county, and work in the other, you register with both Yuba and Sutter counties.

Land lines will automatically be uploaded into the Code Red system. However, if you want to receive notification on a mobile device, or if your home phone is a Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP), you should register to receive notifications at www.bepreparedsutter.org or www.bepreparedyuba.org, and/or download the smartphone app.

If you previously signed up for emergency notifications through Nixle, you will need to re-register with Code Red to continue to receive emergency messages from Sutter County.

You can also receive Code Red notifications to your smartphone by downloading the Code Red app. When you download the app, you will receive messages on your smartphone whether you are in Yuba County or Sutter County.

The app is free to use, but the vendor offers additional paid features. It is not necessary to purchase anything to receive Code Red emergency notifications.

The Code Red app is a free download that allows subscribers to receive notifications directly to their mobile device when they are in a jurisdiction which relies on Code Red for emergency notifications. Sutter County, Yuba County, Butte County, and Nevada County all use Code Red. Messages can include text and/or audio and feature a map with location of the warning area.

Code Red is available on iOS and Android devices from the Apple App Store or Google Play.

Use a QR code reader to scan the code to download the app. Or register at
www.bepreparedsutter.org
or
www.bepreparedyuba.org

Mailing of State General Election Voter Documents
October 02, 2018

The State General Election Official Voter Information Guides are in the mail to voters.

The County Sample Ballot and Voter Information Guides will be mailed on October 3rd. Vote By Mail Ballots will be mailed beginning October 8th. Last day to register for the November 6th General Election is October 22nd.

For more information, see the Sutter County Elections webpage: https://www.suttercounty.org/elections.

Sutter County Public Health Confirms Live Bat Taken To School Is Rabid
September 20, 2018

Yuba City, California. On September 17, 2018, a live bat was found at the 400 block of Humphrey Rd. in Sutter County. A child then took the bat to Franklin Elementary School located at 332 North Township, Yuba City, CA.

Sutter Animal Services Staff responded to the school and collected the bat. Sutter Animal Services Authority submitted the bat for rabies testing through the Sutter County Health Department and it was found to be rabid.

Sutter County Health Department contacted School Officials and the parents of the child with specific instructions.

The Center for Disease and Control (CDC) states on their website “Avoid contact with wild animals. Put screens on all windows and use chimney caps. Place draft-guards beneath doors to ensure that all doors to the outside close tightly. Do not keep doors or unscreened windows open, especially if people are sleeping. Evacuate any room with a live bat and close the door”.

Contact Sutter Animal Services Authority (SASA) at: 530-822-7375 immediately if there is a live or dead bat inside or outside your home. Never touch bats, especially if appearing sick or dead. Keep your pets' rabies vaccinations up-to-date.

For more information on rabies: San Francisco Public Health Communicable Disease control and Public Health: http://www.sfcdcp.org/rabies.html and California Department of Public Health: https://archive.cdph.ca.gov/HealthInfo/discond/Pages/rabies.aspx

Gina Rowland Hired As Sutter County’s Human Resources Director
September 13, 2018

Sutter County has hired Yolo County’s Human Resources Director to the same position in Sutter County.

Gina Rowland has almost a quarter century of human resources experience in local government, most of it with Yolo County. Prior to her appointment as Human Resources Director in May 2016, she served as Yolo County’s Assistant Director of Human Resources and the Human Services Branch Director for Human Resources.

Ms. Rowland’s tenure with a larger county that has experienced similar issues facing Sutter County will be invaluable. Yolo County has 1,750 employees and nine bargaining units. Sutter County has 1,000 employees and five bargaining units.

Ms. Rowland is a Yuba City High School graduate who moved back to Yuba City two years ago and expressed a desire to work in the community she calls home. “I am excited to join the Sutter County family,” Ms. Rowland said. “ Yuba City is my home. I live here, my family lives here, and it is where I plan to retire. I believe my role and the role of Human Resources is to serve employees, and I plan to take the time to listen to find out how I can best do that.”

As Human Resources Director, she will be a key member of the County’s Executive Team and will be responsible for supervising and coordinating the County’s risk management programs, directing the negotiation of labor agreements, administering the County’s grievance and disciplinary policies, administering the County’s recruitment and selection system, and designing and administering a wide variety of employee benefit programs.

The Board approved an employment contract with Ms. Rowland at its September 11 meeting. She is expected to begin on September 24.

Second Street Road Closure in Yuba City
September 11, 2018

Starting on Friday, September 14, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. to September 16, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. Second Street in Yuba City will be closed between Bridge Street and the 5th Street Bridge off-ramp at Second Street to allow construction crews to erect girders for the new Second Street undercrossing.

The 5th Street Bridge will remain open to vehicular traffic during the Second Street closure. However, the sidewalk on the 5th Street Bridge will be closed during this time. The City of Yuba City is committed to providing the highest quality service; while we expect impacts to be minimal, we would like to thank all residents who travel on Second Street for their cooperation and understanding. If you have any questions or concerns regarding the planned closure, please contact Paul Chang at 530-763-4789 or [email protected]

Sutter County Public Health Drive-Thru Flu Shot Clinic
September 10, 2018

Mark your calendar. A drive-thru flu shot clinic and prescription drug drop-off is coming up!

WHEN

Saturday, October 6th
10:00 am – 12:00 pm

WHERE

Live Oak High School
2351 Pennington Road, Live Oak

QUESTIONS?

Call 530-822-7215.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Please be sure to wear loose clothing that quickly bares the upper arm! You must be at least age 14 to get a flu shot. A $5 donation is accepted.

Both Counties, Three Cities Reach Tentative Recology Agreements
September 06, 2018

Recycle Symbol Many Yuba-Sutter residents will see lower-than-anticipated rate increases for waste removal, under a tentative agreement reached between Recology and five jurisdictions that include the two counties of Sutter and Yuba and the cities of Live Oak, Marysville, and Wheatland.

All five jurisdictions, part of the Regional Waste Management Authority (RWMA), agreed on an approach that would revise and replace the existing agreements with Recology for garbage, recycling, and organic collection and disposal services.

“We truly believe our efforts achieved very good outcomes for our communities,” said Robert Bendorf, Yuba County Administrator. “What we have now are agreements that include comprehensive terms, reasonable risk sharing between the parties and services at rates that are reasonable.”

Current municipal solid waste collection services agreements for Yuba and Sutter counties and all four of its cities are set to expire in October 2019, unless replaced or extended. RWMA took the first steps toward new agreements back in 2016 that included community input, local member agency input and an analysis and recommendations report.

All RWMA members initially considered two available options: having the solid waste collection franchise agreements in their respective jurisdictions put out to bid or negotiating with Recology on a the current provider Recology.

Last year, Yuba City decided to seek proposals from other solid waste collection agencies, while the remaining five RWMA members chose to negotiate with Recology with the understanding that, if unsuccessful, each of the five jurisdictions would put the contract out to public bid.

“Under the terms of the previous agreement, our communities were facing a nearly 13 percent rate increase, beginning next month in October,” said Scott Mitnick, Sutter County Administrator. “Over the past few months, we had highly successful discussions with Recology, which resulted in avoiding such a large increase. In fact, under the new tentative agreement, residents within the five jurisdictions who use 64 and 96 gallon programs will experience monthly rate reductions of 30 percent to 46 percent. Those residents who use the 32 gallon three-cart service will experience an approximately 2.5 percent increase.”

The agreement does include increases to recycling service charges for commercial customers. However, Recology is taking steps to minimize any impacts by phasing in the increases over an 18 month period, rather than all at once.

“Recology valued the opportunity to put together an agreement that reflected a unified voice with the cities and counties; including, a continued focus on providing true benefits to our community,” said Recology Community Outreach Coordinator Jackie Sillman.

Recology also agreed to enhance some existing services and provide programs, as part of the agreements. Residents will be able to include food waste in the residential organics collection program at no additional cost. A new illegal dumping and cleanup program will be provided by Recology at no cost to jurisdictions, as well as a new graffiti abatement program.

The initial term of the tentative agreements is ten years and includes the option for two five year extensions. Annual rate adjustments will be simplified, as part of the agreements, with increases limited to no more than three percent. The agreements must still go before both boards of supervisors and all three city councils for approval.

Sutter County Ag Products Rebound From 2016, Up 13.5 Percent
September 05, 2018

2017 Crop Report After five years of drought, and despite heavy rains in late winter and early spring, Sutter County’s crop and livestock values increased 13.5 percent in 2017 over the previous year, to nearly $584 million, according to the annual Sutter County Crop and Livestock Report released this week.

Overall values were estimated at $583,996,000 in 2017 compared to $514,372,000 in 2016, according to Agricultural Commissioner Lisa Herbert.

"Despite historic rains in early 2017, Sutter County agriculture continues to thrive," said Agricultural Commissioner Lisa Herbert.

At approximately $152 million, rice retained the status of top-ranking crop in 2017, despite a drop of 29 percent in total rice acreage planted as a result of wet weather in late winter and early spring. There were slight increases in per acre yields and in the price growers received for rice to help it stay number one.

Higher acreage and price increased walnut values by 10 percent in 2017 over 2016, rising to $130.4 million.

Prunes seemed to pick up the most ground. After devastating crop losses in 2016, pruned rebounded to third from seventh with an increase in total value of 113 percent to $52.3 million.

Nursery products remained fourth with an increase in total value to $47.3 million—a 33 percent jump.

Decreases in acreage, yield, and price dropped processing peach value to $43.7 million.

Despite a 30 percent increase in acreage, almonds remained in sixth place due to a price drop. Total value rose to $36.2 million.

Overall, field crops rose in value by 15 percent. Seed crops increased in value by almost 41 percent, due largely to sunflower and watermelon acreage increases. Producers saw an increase in prices for watermelon seed of 263 percent.

Overall, vegetable crops dropped in value by 22 percent, largely due to a decrease in both acreage and price for processing tomatoes.

The report is prepared based on estimates provided by growers. It reflects estimated gross values only and does not reflect net profits or losses to the producers.

To see the entire report, visit this link: https://www.suttercounty.org/assets/pdf/ag/CropReports/2017_Crop_Report.pdf

Bat with Rabies Confirmed in Yuba City
August 30, 2018

Yuba City, California. On August 27, 2018, a live bat was found clinging to a walkway fence on the Yuba City High School premises located at 850 B Street.

The bat was collected by Sutter Animal Services Authority and was submitted for rabies testing through the Sutter County Health Department and it was found to be rabid.

The Center for Disease and Control (CDC) states on their website “Avoid contact with wild animals. Put screens on all windows and use chimney caps. Place draft-guards beneath doors to ensure that all doors to the outside close tightly. Do not keep doors or unscreened windows open, especially if people are sleeping. Evacuate any room with a live bat and close the door”.

Contact Sutter Animal Services Authority (SASA) at: 530-822-7375 immediately if there is a live or dead bat inside or outside your home. Never touch bats, especially if appearing sick or dead. Keep your pets' rabies vaccinations up-to-date.

For more information on rabies: San Francisco Public Health Communicable Disease control and Public Health: http://www.sfcdcp.org/rabies.html and California Department of Public Health: https://archive.cdph.ca.gov/HealthInfo/discond/Pages/rabies.aspx

Holiday Closure
August 28, 2018
On Monday, September 3, most county offices will be closed for Labor Day.
Temporary Boat Access Closure Feather River at 5th Street Bridge
August 28, 2018

Boat closure Yuba City/Marysville, California. Starting on Tuesday, September 4, 2018 at 12:01 a.m. the Feather River boating channel at the 5th Street Bridge will remain closed to all watercraft until September 6, 2018 at 11:00 p.m. This is a schedule change from previously announced dates of August 26, 2018 to August 30, 2018. The channel will remain open during these dates in August through the Labor Day weekend. This will allow the contractor mobilization of large drilling equipment to the west levee side of the project and will not affect traffic on the 5th Street Bridge.

The City of Yuba City is committed to providing the highest quality service; we thank all those recreationalists who use this navigational channel under the 5th Street Bridge for their cooperation and understanding. If you have any questions or concerns regarding the planned closure, please contact Paul Chang at 530-763-4789 or [email protected].

Temporary Feather River Boat Access Closure at 5th Street Bridge
August 14, 2018

Boat closure Yuba City/Marysville, California. Starting on Sunday, August 26, 2018 at 10:00 p.m. the Feather River boating channel at the 5th Street Bridge will be closed. This channel access will remain closed to all watercraft from August 26, 2018 at 10:00 p.m. until August 30, 2018 at 11:00 p.m. This will allow the contractor mobilization of large drilling equipment to the west levee side of the project and will not affect traffic on the 5th Street Bridge.

The City of Yuba City is committed to providing the highest quality service; we thank all those fisherman and recreationalists who use this navigational channel under the 5th Street Bridge for their cooperation and understanding. If you have any questions or concerns regarding the planned closure, please contact Paul Chang at 530-763-4789 or [email protected].

Air Quality Health Advisory – Extended
August 14, 2018

Monday August 13 to Wednesday August 15, 2018

The Public Health Officers for Yuba and Sutter counties and the Feather River Air Quality Management District are extending the joint air quality health advisory to notify the public of potentially poor air quality conditions. Smoke from regional wildfires resulted in Moderate to Unhealthy levels of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) the past couple weeks in the Yuba Sutter area. Conditions have improved and will likely continue to improve; however smoke impacts are still possible, especially overnight into the morning hours over the next couple days. Current air quality conditions measured at the permanent monitor in Yuba City and the FRAQMD portable monitor (EBAM) in Camptonville are displayed at www.airnow.gov and www.sparetheair.com/wildfire.cfm.

Bat with Rabies Confirmed in Sutter County
August 09, 2018

Live Oak, California. On August 2, 2018, a citizen found a live injured bat inside his home in the vicinity of the 8900 block of Larkin Blvd, in Live Oak, CA.

The bat was collected by Sutter Animal Services Authority and was submitted for rabies testing through the Sutter County Health Department and it was found to be rabid. The two adults and three children living in the home will undergo preventative post-exposure prophylaxis treatment. The three indoor dogs will undergo a strict 30-day quarantine.

The Center for Disease and Control (CDC) states on their website “Avoid contact with wild animals. Put screens on all windows and use chimney caps. Place draft-guards beneath doors to ensure that all doors to the outside close tightly. Do not keep doors or unscreened windows open, especially if people are sleeping. Evacuate any room with a live bat and close the door”.

Contact Sutter Animal Services Authority (SASA) at: 530-822-7375 immediately if there is a live or dead bat inside or outside your home. Never touch bats, especially if appearing sick or dead. Keep your pets' rabies vaccinations up-to-date.

For more information on rabies: San Francisco Public Health Communicable Disease control and Public Health: http://www.sfcdcp.org/rabies.html and California Department of Public Health: https://archive.cdph.ca.gov/HealthInfo/discond/Pages/rabies.aspx

Air Quality Health Advisory – Extended
August 09, 2018

Thursday August 9 through Thursday August 13, 2018

The Public Health Officers for Yuba and Sutter counties and the Feather River Air Quality Management District are extending the joint air quality health advisory to notify the public of poor air quality conditions. Wildfire smoke from regional wildfires is resulting in Moderate to Unhealthy levels of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Smoke impacts and unhealthy levels of ozone and PM2.5 may continue through the weekend. Current air quality conditions measured at the permanent monitor in Yuba City and the FRAQMD portable monitor (EBAM) in Camptonville are displayed at www.airnow.gov and www.sparetheair.com/wildfire.cfm.

Sutter Buttes Fire: 100 Percent Contained
August 02, 2018

August 2, 2018 11:30 a.m. Sutter Buttes Fire: 100 Percent Contained

Sutter County Fire Chief John Shalowitz said this morning the grass fire in the Sutter Buttes that threatened a communications array and led to the evacuation of four homes earlier this week is 100 percent contained.

Sutter County Fire personnel will continue to monitor the area until there is no further threat.

Cause of the fire, which was reported just before 5 p.m. on Tuesday, is unknown and under investigation, Chief Shalowitz said. Fire burned approximately 1,200 acres, spreading from Pass Road up and around South Butte between Brockman and Moore canyons—between Kellogg and West Butte roads.

Evacuation orders were lifted late Wednesday, and Pass Road through the Sutter Buttes was re-opened to traffic.

Fire fighters from several surrounding communities responded to the fire, along with fire fighters from CalFire, Beale Air Force Base, and Sacramento County.

The fire caused minor damage to a communications array on the western peak of South Butte. No homes were lost and no injuries were reported.

The fire was never a threat to communities surrounding the Sutter Buttes.

 

August 1, 2018 - 8:30 P.M. The Sutter Buttes Fire At 90 Percent Containment, Pass Road Open

Some 27 hours after it began, the fire in the Sutter Buttes is 90 percent contained and several fire fighters from throughout the region are being deployed to other responsibilities. Pass Road through the Sutter Buttes has been opened.

The residents in four homes along Pass Road are being allowed to return as all evacuation orders have been lifted.

Firefighters from the Sutter County Fire Department continue to work the fire, which currently is no threat to structures or communities surrounding the Buttes. Residents are reminded to remain vigilant, however.

The fire broke out along Pass Road about 5 p.m. on Tuesday, July 31, and spread rapidly up South Butte. Firefighters mitigated damage to a communications array on South Butte, and have contained 90 percent of the fire. Fire fighters from surrounding communities and Sacramento County responded. The Sacramento Metro Fire Department supplied aerial resources.

 

August 1, 2018- 4 PM The Sutter Buttes Fire Is At 1200 Acres, 80 Percent Contained

Fire crews worked throughout the day to obtain 80 percent containment of a grass fire in the Sutter Buttes. Four homes have been evacuated. Some residents in the Buttes have been advised to be prepared to evacuate, but the fire does not threaten any of the communities surrounding the world’s smallest mountain range.

The fire is estimated to be approximately 1,200 acres, and is not expected to increase in size.

Crews established containment on the western, eastern and southern flanks, but fire is burning in a northwesterly direction from South Butte toward West Butte.

Firefighters from Yuba City, Pleasant Grove, Meridian, East Nicolaus, Beale Air Force Base, Colusa County, CalFire, and Sacramento responded to the blaze. Sutter County fire crews remain on scene. Two helicopters were deployed this morning to assist with the fire fight.

Sutter County Public Works Road crews have Pass Road blocked at Acacia and West Butte Road. The road will remain closed as long as the fire is active.

Sutter County Office of Emergency Management opened an emergency operations center at the County Administrative building and assisted with resource requests from the Fire Department.

The Sutter County Sheriff’s Department mobile communications trailer was dispatched to assist law enforcement and fire personnel with communications.

Fire crews were warned about rattle snakes and wild hogs, as well as shifting wind patterns in the Buttes.

The fire was reported shortly before 5 p.m. Tuesday, July 31, along Pass Road between Kellogg Road and West Butte Road. It spread up South Butte, causing minor damage to a communications array; westerly toward West Butte Road, and easterly toward Kellogg and Moore roads. Four homes along Pass Road have been evacuated, and residents along West Butte and Kellogg roads have been advised they may have to evacuate.

One person sheltered overnight at Sutter High School. The shelter was closed this morning.

Photo of the fire at night
Fire Services reviewing a map
Trucks in front of the fire damage
Smoke-Free Public Housing
July 30, 2018

On July 1, 2018 the Regional Housing Authority (RHA) took a major step towards improving the health and safety of public housing residents by implementing the new federal Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Smoke-Free Public Housing rule.

This rule prohibits the use of lit tobacco products anywhere inside a HUD funded housing complex (with the exception of mixed financed properties). It includes individual units, common areas, administrative offices, and all areas within 25 feet of its buildings. RHA has expanded the Smoke-Free rule to include the use of electronic smoking devices, to further protect residents.

Sutter County Public Health applauds the decision to go smoke-free as it reduces the risk of exposure to secondhand smoke and smoke-related maintenance costs. HUD determined that the only way to fully protect people from secondhand smoke is by eliminating smoking indoors and close to buildings. In addition to protecting residents and employees from secondhand smoke, smoke-free policies create healthy environments that encourage people who smoke to quit or attempt to reduce smoking.

Smoke-free housing is good for everyone’s health. Both Public Housing Authority staff and residents will benefit from this rule, which includes more than 760,000 children and 329,000 senior residents nationwide. Secondhand smoke is a known cause of cancer and is also linked to breathing problems and heart disease in non-smokers. It can have serious health effects on non-smokers, especially children, older adults, and people with lung problems.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, children who breathe secondhand smoke are more likely to get sick, cough, and wheeze. Other health issues caused by secondhand smoke in infants and children include asthma attacks, respiratory infections, ear infections, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Some of the health conditions caused by secondhand smoke in adults include coronary heart disease, stroke, and lung cancer. According to researchers, the annual cost of smoking in Sutter County is estimated at more than $56 million, more than $30 million of that in direct health care costs (Max et al., 2014).

For more information on "Creating a Healthier Sutter" and adopting a voluntary policy for a Smoke-Free Multi-Unit Housing Property call Sutter County Public Health Tobacco Control staff at (530) 822-7215. Residents are encouraged to attend Richland Housing’s ‘National Night Out’ Event from 5pm to 8pm on August 7th, 2018 to celebrate with us, learn more about Smoke-Free housing policies, and pick up a free tobacco cessation "quit kit."

Holiday Closure
July 03, 2018
On Wednesday, July 4th, most county offices will be closed in observance of Independence Day.
In Sutter County, Dangerous Fireworks Will Lead To $1,000 Fine For The User And Whoever Controls The Property
June 26, 2018

Sutter County has adopted an ordinance allowing local prosecution and administrative fines for those who use, possess, store, sell, or display dangerous fireworks as defined by the state of California’s Health and Safety Code, Sections 12500-12728.

Those who violate the ordinance, and those who allow the use, possession, storage, sale or display of dangerous fireworks on their property, can now be cited by Sutter County authorities for a misdemeanor and fined up to $1,000 for each instance.

The following are some of the more common “Dangerous Fireworks” already outlawed by the Health and Safety Code, and their possession, use, storage, sale, or display could get you convicted of a misdemeanor: firecrackers; skyrockets and rockets, including any and all devices which employ any combustible or explosive material and which rise in the air during discharge; Roman candles, including all devices which discharge balls of fire into the air; chasers, including all devices which dart or travel about the surface of the ground during discharge; sparklers more than 10 inches in length or one-fourth of one inch in diameter; and all fireworks designed and intended by the manufacturer to create the element of surprise upon the user, including autofoolers, cigarette loads, exploding golf balls, and trick matches.

The ordinance does not prohibit the use of “Safe and Sane” fireworks bearing the seal of the California State Fire Marshal and purchased from June 28 through noon on July 6.

The Board of Supervisors adopted the ordinance as an emergency measure at its June 12 meeting, in advance of Fourth of July. The use or possession of dangerous or illegal fireworks poses a serious risk to the public health, safety and welfare, given the potential for personal bodily injury, property damage, the unknown material composition of the fireworks, and the lack of safeguards.

The ordinance addresses several complaints from residents about the large number of dangerous and illegal fireworks that are fired, particularly around the Fourth of July and the New Year’s. Animals are spooked by the constant explosions. Some military veterans have also complained the percussions are triggering symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

In 2016, 11,100 trips to emergency rooms in the United States were the result of fireworks-related injuries, compared to 7,000 in 2008, according to data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. The bulk of these injuries occurring during the month-long period around Independence Day—June 18 through July 18.

The ordinance, impacting unincorporated areas of the County, can be enforced by the Sheriff’s Department, Sutter County Fire Department, Sutter County Code Enforcement, and the Director of Development Services. The ordinance is similar to one adopted by the City of Yuba City and enforced within the city limits.

Official Final 2018 Statewide Direct Primary Election Results
June 25, 2018
Stay Cool Sutter
June 21, 2018
Stay Cool Sutter
Unofficial Statewide Direct Primary Election Results
June 06, 2018

The current unofficial count for the Election Results will be posted and updated periodically after the Polls close at 8:00 p.m. on June 5, 2018.

Sutter County To Pursue Security Enhancements At Boat Ramps
June 05, 2018

The Sutter County General Services Department is actively pursuing security enhancements at three of the four boat ramps it operates.

General Services Director Megan Greve said the plan is to install security fencing, on-line or credit card payments, and a gate lock system to reduce vandalism and thefts at boat ramps at Boyd's Pump and the Yuba City Boat Dock on the Feather River, and at Tisdale Weir on the Sacramento River.

Improvements are expected to be in place this fall, Greve said.

In the interim, Greve said, boaters will not be required to pay the daily use fee. The County is removing the cash boxes used to collect boat ramp use fees because the boxes have been destroyed a multitude of times and money from the boat fees stolen. The enhancements will allow for the safe and secure collection of fees that are to be used to provide annual maintenance of the docks. Over the past two years, the revenue collected has been reduced by over $10,000 due to theft and vandalism.

"These security enhancements are what many boaters have been asking Sutter County to provide," Greve said. "We'll provide a more secure parking lot while boaters are out on the water."

No changes are planned at Live Oak Park boat ramp, where there is a park attendant on duty.

Sutter County Facilities and Campuses Designated as “Smoke & Tobacco Free”
May 25, 2018

The Sutter County Public Health - Tobacco Control Program applauds the Sutter County Board of Supervisors for designating all County owned, leased, and operated facilities and campuses as Smoke and Tobacco-Free. The new policy, approved by the Board of Supervisors on April 10, 2018, will include all enclosed and unenclosed areas, including buildings, grounds, parks, and parking lots. Implementation of the new policy will begin on World No Tobacco Day, May 31, 2018.

The Smoke and Tobacco-Free Campus policy declares that the use of any tobacco product, or use of any product that mimics smoking or produces smoke be prohibited. This policy applies to all staff, campus visitors, clients, vendors, contractors and volunteers. The policy designation promotes the health and well-being of all Sutter County employees and the community they serve by decreasing risk of secondhand smoke inhalation. Sutter County facilities and campuses will be a place where we can all practice health. “This is a great step forward in providing a healthier place to live and work for Sutter County employees and for the people that they serve,” stated Dr. Lou Anne Cummings, Sutter County Health Officer.

According to the California Department of Public Health, about 13% of Sutter County adults smoke and 10% of high school aged youth smoke. This means roughly 77% of Sutter County residents DO NOT smoke. In a public opinion survey of Sutter

County residents, 78% reported they would prefer to visit a business that prohibited smoking on the property. In Sutter County, 1 in 5 deaths each year is attributed to smoking (Max et al., 2014). According to Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention, secondhand smoke is a preventable factor of numerous health problems in infants and children, including asthma attacks, respiratory infections, ear infections, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Some of the health conditions caused by secondhand smoke in adults include coronary heart disease, stroke, and lung cancer. According to researchers, the annual cost of smoking in Sutter County is estimated at more than $56 million, more than $30 million of that in direct health care costs (Max et al., 2014).

For more information on “Creating a Healthier Sutter” and adopting a voluntary policy for a Smoke and Tobacco-Free Campus call Sutter County Public Health Tobacco Control staff at (530) 822-7215. Residents are encouraged to visit the Sutter County Library (750 Forbes Avenue) from 1pm to 5pm on May 31, 2018 to celebrate with us, learn more, and pick up a free tobacco cessation “quit kit.”

Holiday Closure
May 23, 2018
On Monday, May 28th, most County offices will be closed in observance of Memorial Day.
Statewide Direct Primary Election
May 15, 2018

With the Statewide Direct Primary Election coming up soon on June 5th, visit the Sutter County Elections page to find election guides and voter information for vote by mail status, polling place locator, and more.

Be informed and vote!

Yuba-Sutter-Colusa United Way Community Resource Fair
May 11, 2018
Community Resource Fair Flyer 2018
Sutter County Sues Opioid Manufacturers, Distributors for Opioid Epidemic
May 09, 2018

The County of Sutter filed a lawsuit against the opioid manufacturers and distributors for creating the opioid epidemic in Sutter County, joining a consortium of 30 California counties to do so. The Sutter County Board of Supervisors has retained the national law firm of Baron & Budd and a joint venture of law firms to represent its interests, seeking an abatement remedy in addition to legal damages for taxpayer money spent providing social resources in response to the crisis. The lawsuit was filed in the Eastern District of California.

The California Opioid Consortium includes 30 counties, representing approximately 10.5 million residents. All 30 counties are filing suit in federal court and expect their cases to be transferred into the Multi-District Litigation in Ohio, where over 500 public entities have filed similar suits.

“The County seeks to recover taxpayer funds used to respond to the opioid epidemic,” said Assistant Sutter County Counsel William J. Vanasek. “Local government services have been subsidizing the impact of the opioid epidemic, created by irresponsible multi-billion-dollar corporations, which have placed profits over public safety.”

The California Opioid Consortium and its counsel have developed evidence that many of the nation’s largest drug manufactures misinformed doctors about the addictiveness and efficacy of opioids. The manufacturer Defendants include Purdue Pharma; Teva Ltd; Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (a wholly-owned subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson); Endo Health Solutions, Inc.; Allergan PLC; and Mallinckrodt. Drugs manufactured by these companies include, but are not limited to: OxyContin, Actiq, Fentora, Duragesic, Nucynta, Nucynta ER, Opana/Opana ER, Percodan, Percocet, Zydone, Kadian and Norco.

The lawsuit also names the nation’s largest drug distributors – Cardinal Health, AmerisourceBergen, and McKesson Corp. – which failed to monitor, identify and report “suspicious” opioid shipments to pharmacies, in violation of the federal Controlled Substances Act. The lawsuit also names other large national distributor/retailers.

The County’s entire legal team includes the law firms of Baron & Budd; Levin, Papantonio, Thomas, Mitchell, Rafferty & Proctor; Powell & Majestro; Greene Ketchum Bailey Farrell & Tweel; Hill, Peterson, Carper, Bee & Deitzler; McHugh Fuller Law Group. The firms currently represent over 300 cities and counties throughout the United States.

For more information, please contact John Fiske at [email protected] or at 619-261-4090.

Fast-Track Building Permits Now Available Online
May 07, 2018

To help facilitate the Building Permit process for customers, Sutter County Development Services Department has released an online application that now allows contractors and owner-builders to apply and pay for certain fast-track building permits. A temporary permit is immediately issued. The customer will be notified once an official building permit is available for pick-up from the Development Services Customer Service Counter. An official building permit will need to be in-hand before a building inspection can be scheduled.

Eligible fast-track building permits include the following:

  • HVAC change-outs
  • Water heater change-outs
  • Agricultural electrical meters
  • Electric meter upgrades
  • Gas line permits
  • Siding replacements
  • Window replacements
  • Re-roof permits
  • Residential roof mounted solar less than 10KW

It is important to note that the physical location for the work to be performed must be in the jurisdiction of Sutter County and not located within the City of Yuba City or the City of Live Oak.

Links to the fast-track building permits are under the Online Building Permits section on the Building Services page. You can also find on the Building Services page additional information about building permit requirements.

Visit the Building Services page.

Sutter County Supervisors approve road projects in South Sutter County and the Sutter Buttes
April 25, 2018

The Sutter County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved contracts for an asphalt overlay of three sections of Pleasant Grove Road in southern Sutter County, as well as a 500-foot section of guard rail on a curve along Pass Road in the Sutter Buttes.

The Board awarded a contract to Teichert Construction Co. of Roseville for $833,751. Teichert was the lowest of nine responsible bidders, coming in $180,000 below the highest bidder, Escheman Construction. The contract is for an asphalt overlay on three segments of Pleasant Grove Road, for a total of 3.3 miles of overlay: from Sankey Road to Keys Road, from Howsley Road to Catlett Road, and from Kempton Road to Betz Road.

The Board awarded a contract to Highway Specialty Company Inc. of Redding, for $22,900, the lowest of four bids, for 500 feet of guardrail in a curve on Pass Road in the Sutter Buttes, about a mile from Lemenager Road. The highest bid was for $146,650 by Swierstok Enterprise Inc.

Speech Contest
March 29, 2018

For the third time, the Sutter County Board of Supervisors and the Active 20-30 Club of Yuba City-Marysville hosted the Public Business From The Floor High School Speech Contest. Seventeen students from five high schools participated in the Wednesday, March 28 event in the Board Chambers at the 19th century Hall of Records in Yuba City.

Under both the United States Constitution and California law, members of the public are allowed to petition their local government (as well as the state and federal government). At every local public agency meeting, the public has an opportunity to address the elected representatives about issues that are on the agenda, and any items they wish to discuss that are under the jurisdiction of the local government agency.

“This contest is specifically designed to introduce high school students to the opportunity of speaking up about issues of public importance,” said Board Chairman Dan Flores. “We’ve learned from the teachers at the various schools that students who have participated in this contest have remained engaged in civic matters. I believe this contest is not only unique, but valuable, in that it is an exercise in democracy, and the Board members really appreciate the input from the youth of the community. We don’t get enough of that.”

This contest, which will occur again in 2019, requires speakers to exhibit their general public speaking skills while addressing the Board of Supervisors about matters under the county’s jurisdiction, making a clear request of the Board of Supervisors, using facts and examples of their research, and adhering to the three-minute clock rule adopted by the Board of Supervisors (courts have determined that local public agencies are required to provide only a limited opportunity for public input during meetings, and therefore have the right to place a time limit on public comments so that public agencies can proceed with their noticed agenda in an efficient manner).

East Nicolaus High School’s Sophia Dunlap won first place and $500 for a speech on homeless issues. Sutter Union High School’s Harpreet Mahi won second place and $300 for a speech on mental health funding. Sophia Garcia of Yuba City High School, and Orrin Jones of Live Oak High School, tied for third place and won $200 each. Sophia gave a speech on recreation funding and Orrin gave a speech on future evacuations in the event of flooding.

Speech topics student safety at schools, speeding cars, use of fracking in extracting oil, expansion of food banks, expansion of public transportation to rural communities, drug addiction, and consumer education.

The 20-30 Club donated $1,200 in cash prizes. They have sponsored the cash prizes in each of the three contests so far.

High schools participating were Yuba City, River Valley, East Nicolaus, Sutter, and Live Oak. All high school aged students in Sutter County, including those at charter schools, were invited to participate.

Holiday Closure
March 26, 2018
On Friday, March 30th, most county offices will be closed in observance of Cesar Chavez Day.
Celebrate Public Health Week
February 28, 2018

Creating a Healthier Sutter

HEALTHY LIFE
WHEN: Monday April 2nd
WHERE: Veterans Hall
1425 Veterans Memorial Cir.
Yuba City, CA
TIME: 11:00am-3:00pm

HEALTHY MIND
WHEN: Tuesday April 3rd
WHERE: Public Health Building
1445 Veterans Memorial Cir.
Yuba City, CA
TIME: 11:00am-3:00pm

HEALTHY KIDS
WHEN: Thursday April 5th
WHERE: Veterans Hall
1425 Veterans Memorial Cir.
Yuba City, CA
TIME: 11:00am-3:00pm

For more information call (530) 822-7215

Passport Day
February 15, 2018

Event: Passport Day
Date: Saturday, March 10, 2018
Time: 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Where: Sutter County Clerk Recorder
433 Second Street
Yuba City, CA 95991

The Sutter County Clerk Recorder is hosting a special event in Yuba City, California on Saturday, March 10, 2018 from 9:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m., to provide passport information to U.S. citizens and to accept passport applications. Applications will be accepted by appointment only. Avoid the $10 increase in Passport Acceptance Fees by coming in before Monday, April 2, 2018. Please contact Sutter County Clerk-Recorder to schedule your appointment by calling 530-822-7134.

U.S. citizens must present a valid passport book when entering the United States by air. U.S. citizens entering the United States from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean and Bermuda at land borders and sea ports of entry must present a passport book, passport card, or other travel documents approved by the U.S. government.

To help our customers who may not be able to visit our office during our normal business hours, additional services such as certified copies of Birth, Death and Marriage Certificates, Fictitious Business Name Statements, Passport photos, issuance of Marriage Licenses and performing Marriage Ceremonies (by appointment only) will be available on this Saturday.

Information on the cost and how to apply for a U.S. passport is available at travel.state.gov. U.S. citizens may also obtain passport information by phone, in English and Spanish, by calling the National Passport Information Center toll-free at 1-877-487-2778.

Holiday Closure
February 12, 2018
On Monday, February 19th, most county offices will be closed in observance of Washington's Birthday.
CDPH News Release
January 12, 2018

The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) today announced that flu activity in California is widespread and at levels usually seen at the peak of the influenza season. Health officials encourage Californians to get vaccinated.

“With the increase in influenza impacting many communities across the entire state, it is important to get a flu shot now if you have not done so already,” said CDPH Director and State Public Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith. “Although influenza season usually peaks between December and February, flu activity can occur as late as May, which means it is not too late to get vaccinated.”

It takes about two weeks after vaccination for the body to respond fully. Vaccine effectiveness does vary for the different strains and year by year. Data will be available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in February about vaccine effectiveness.

“Vaccination will prevent infection in a large number of cases. If disease does occur after vaccination, the vaccine can reduce the severity of flu symptoms,” said Dr. Smith. "Getting the flu shot is still the best way to protect yourself and others from flu.”

View additional information.

New Museum Exhibit - Tattooed and Tenacious: Inked Women in California’s History
January 12, 2018

Come see the latest exhibit at the Community Memorial Museum of Sutter County, Tattooed and Tenacious: Inked Women in California’s History. The exhibit opens January 13th, 2018, and is on display through March 11th. We’re holding an opening reception Friday, January 12th at 6pm. We’ll have wine, beer and nibbles, and it’s open to the public.

Some further information on the exhibit:

While many may think of tattoos as a recent trend, inked women have a long history in California. From the working-class Tattooed Ladies who performed in circus sideshows to the upper-class inked women who helped popularize the tattoo craze; visitors will discover the largely unknown history of women and tattoos through photographs, personal histories, and artifacts.

Inked women who come to see the exhibit will have the opportunity to add their own tattoos to the exhibit on our ‘Locally Inked’ wall, using an instant camera provided by the Museum. Just let our staff know that you want to add your ink to the exhibit!

The exhibit will also feature artworks from contemporary tattoo artists from Yuba City and Marysville, juxtaposing tattooing of the past with the inked women of today. Artists included work at To the Grave Tattoo, Heart n Soul, Righteous Ink, and Artistic Social Club.

Tattooed and Tenacious: Inked Women in California’s History is a traveling exhibition from Exhibit Envoy in partnership with the Hayward Area Historical Society and History San Jose.

Holiday Closure
January 08, 2018
On Monday, January 15th, most county offices will be closed in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.
Food Facility Inspection Reports for Sutter County
January 01, 2018

Facilities that have a permit to operate anywhere in Sutter County–whether they are in the City of Live Oak, Yuba City, or the unincorporated area–are routinely inspected for criteria that meets health and safety codes by Sutter County Environmental Health. These inspection reports are published on the Sutter County website at www.suttercounty.org/facilityinspection.

The goal of providing inspection reports online is to allow potential patrons to review conditions that may exist at a food facility prior to visiting the establishment.

Currently, food facilities are required to keep a copy of their last inspection report at the facility and make it available to customers upon request. As the community continues to grow we are seeing more health conscious individuals who are interested in knowing a little more about where they eat.